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Improved Laziness

I’m really digging Powershell the more that I work with it.  It’s nice to have so much rich functionality within the operating system and not having to fuss with compilers or syntax.  One of my more recent projects was automated restore testing for our servers.  Now, while I won’t be showing that to you (yet), working with that script got me more time with the SMO.

The SMO is incredibly powerful.  You have so much functionality that it can be a little overwhelming.  There’s also a lot of stuff you can do in the SMO that you can also do in standard T-SQL.  As with anything, it’s a matter of using the right tool.  I’m finding that what makes Powershell the right tool is it’s ability to work outside of the database, avoiding some of the restrictions placed (rightly so) on the engine and how it interacts with the OS.  It makes Powershell ideal for things like file manipulation and talking with the OS.  It also gave me a slightly cleaner way to generate restore scripts.

If you have seen my previous restore building script, it was handy that it worked in T-SQL, but because it had no visibilty into the file system, I had no real way to logically combine fulls, diffs, and transaction logs to build a single script.  Sure, I could probably assemble something looking at msdb.dbo.backupset, but that only works if I’ve got access to the server the backups were done on.  By leveraging Powershell and the SMO, I can now read the file system, interogate each backup file to see that it fits in the LSN sequence, and build out a SQL script.

The steps are simple:

  1. Point the script at a target directory where all the backup files live and a SQL instance that has access to the file directory (typically, this is the instance you’ll run the restore on).  You can also declare a database name (if you want something different) and an output directory (which will otherwise default to your My Documents folder).
  2. The script will then use the SMO to read in the backup files, coordinating the LSNs to order them properly for the restore.
  3. The entire restore script will be written to the output directory.

Some caveats:

  • The script identifies files based on extension (.bak for Full, .dff for Differential, and .trn for Transaction Log).  This is based on how I write out my backup files, so this is the key piece of logic that will need to be altered to make this more generic.
  • The full restore will “move” the files to their original location.  If restoring to a different server, you’ll want to alter these file locations.

Now, I’m by no means a Powershell guru, but I do like making my life easier through scripting.  There’s probably more elegant ways to do this, but it’s clean enough for my purposes.  Hopefully in makes your life easier too!

(Feel free to download the script here.)

<#
.SYNOPSIS
Builds Database Restore script, coordinating Full, Diff, and Log backups.
.DESCRIPTION
Generates a database restore .sql script for restoring a database.
Mike Fal (htp://www.mikefal.net) 2012-07-09
.PARAMETER
String
    dir(REQUIRED) - Target directory where backup files reside
    server(REQUIRED) - Target server restore used by SMO to build restore script.  Should be server you want to restore to.
    database - Database name to restore. If blank, database name from the backup will be used.
    outputdir - Output directory for script.  If empty, user's My Documents will be used.
.EXAMPLE
    .\Build-Restore.ps1 -dir "C:\database_backups" -server "localhost"
.NOTES
    Script acquires files based on extension:
        .bak = Full
        .dff = Differential
        .trn = Transaction log
#>
param([parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string] $dir,
      [parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string] $server,
      [string] $database,
      [string] $outputdir=([Environment]::GetFolderPath("MyDocuments")))

#load assemblies
[System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName('Microsoft.SqlServer.SMO') | out-null
[System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.SqlServer.SmoExtended") | Out-Null

#processing functions
function Get-Restore{
    Param($db,
          $backupfile)

    $rs=new-object("Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Restore")
    $rs.Devices.AddDevice($backupfile.FullName, "File")
    $rs.Database=$db
    $rs.NoRecovery=$true
    $rs.Action="Database"

    return $rs
}#Get-Restore

function Get-Header{
    Param($rs,$srv)

    $dt=$restore.ReadBackupHeader($srv)
    return $dt.Rows[0]
}#Get-Header

#START SCRIPT
$sqlout = @()
$smosrv = new-object ('Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server') $server

$full = gci $dir | where {$_.name -like "*.bak"} | Sort-Object LastWriteTime -desc | Select-Object -first 1
$diff = gci $dir | where {$_.name -like "*.dff"} | sort-object LastWriteTime -desc | select-object -first 1
$trns = gci $dir | where {$_.name -like "*.trn"} | sort-object LastWriteTime

#initialize and process full backup
$restore=Get-Restore $database $full
$hfull=Get-Header $restore $smosrv
if($database.Length -eq 0)
{
    $database=$hfull.DatabaseName
    $restore.Database=$database
}

$LSNCheck=$hfull.FirstLSN
$files=$restore.ReadFileList($smosrv)
foreach($file in $files){
        $newfile = New-Object("Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.RelocateFile") ($file.LogicalName,$file.PhysicalName)
        $restore.RelocateFiles.Add($newfile) | out-null
}

$sqlout+="/****************************************************"
$sqlout+="Restore Database Script Generated $(Get-Date)"
$sqlout+="Database: "+$database
$sqlout+="****************************************************/"
$sqlout+="--FULL RESTORE"
$sqlout+=$restore.Script($smosrv)

#process differential backups
if($diff -ne $null){
    $restore=Get-Restore $database $diff
    $hdiff=Get-Header $restore $smosrv

    if($hdiff.DifferentialBaseLSN -eq $LSNCheck){
        $sqlout+="--DIFF RESTORE"
        $sqlout+=$restore.Script($smosrv)
        $LSNCheck = $hdiff.LastLSN
    }
    else{
        $LSNCheck = $hfull.LastLSN
    }
}

#process transaction log backups
if($trns -ne $null){
    $sqlout+="--TRN LOG RESTORE"

    foreach ($trn in $trns){
        $restore=Get-Restore $database $trn
        $htrn=Get-Header $restore $smosrv
        if($htrn.FirstLSN -le $LSNCheck -and $htrn.LastLSN -ge $LSNCheck){
            $sqlout+=$restore.Script($smosrv)
            $LSNCheck = $htrn.LastLSN
        }
    }
}

#Write final recovery line
$sqlout+=&quot;<code>r</code>n&quot;
$sqlout+=&quot;--COMPLETE RESTORE/ONLINE DB&quot;
$sqlout+=&quot;RESTORE DATABASE &quot;+$database+&quot; WITH RECOVERY&quot;

#output script file
$sqlout | Out-File &quot;$outputdir\restore_$database.sql&quot;

2 Comments

  1. […] Improved Laziness – Being lazy really is a good thing, I knew it! Confirming once more that he is a genius, it’s Mike Fal (Blog|Twitter). […]

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